Domestic EPC

Domestic Energy Performance Certificate (EPC)

Domestic Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) rate the energy efficiency of your home.  The ratings for dwellings are based on annual energy costs and run from A (the best) to G (the worst).  The lower the annual cost of energy for your property, the better the rating.

The assessment will also give your home a carbon rating to show how its annual carbon emissions compare to other properties.

Whatever type of home you have, we can help provide the Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) you need.  Our fully accredited assessors are experienced in dealing with all types and sizes of properties including flats, bungalows, houses and Listed Buildings.  We can  arrange assessments for single properties or entire portfolios.

Available from £50

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    Frequently Asked Questions






    Domestic Energy Performance Certificate (EPC)

    England
    Scotland
    Wales
    Northern Ireland
    England

    There is currently no requirement to display a Domestic Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) within a dwelling in England.  However, doing so may be beneficial, particularly in rental properties where it could be affixed to the building in a boiler or meter cupboard.

    In the case of marketing a newly constructed dwelling, care should be taken to ensure that all EPC requirements are met.  Displaying the Energy Performance Certificate in the home communicates the information required to prospective buyers.

    Scotland

    It is a requirement under law in Scotland that the Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) must be ‘affixed’ to the building. Building standards guidance suggests that the EPC be located in the boiler or meter cupboard. A copy should be retained with other legal papers relating to your property.

    Wales

    There is currently no requirement to display a Domestic Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) within a dwelling in England.  However, doing so may be beneficial, particularly in rental properties where it could be affixed to the building in a boiler or meter cupboard.

    In the case of marketing a newly constructed dwelling, care should be taken to ensure that all EPC requirements are met.  Displaying the Energy Performance Certificate in the home communicates the information required to prospective buyers.

    Northern Ireland

    There is currently no requirement to display a Domestic Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) within a dwelling in England.  However, doing so may be beneficial, particularly in rental properties where it could be affixed to the building in a boiler or meter cupboard.

    In the case of marketing a newly constructed dwelling, care should be taken to ensure that all EPC requirements are met.  Displaying the Energy Performance Certificate in the home communicates the information required to prospective buyers.

    We all need to do our bit to improve energy efficiency and to protect the environment for future generations.  If you discover non-compliance you can report the matter to the relevant authority.

    The Property Energy Professional Association (PEPA) has introduced a service for anyone to report instances of non-compliance relating to the energy performance of buildings regulations. Specifically, you can report:

     

    Using the service couldn’t be simpler.  To access the on-line reporting form, click here.

    Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) are currently valid for up to ten years throughout the UK.  However, some schemes reduce this period significantly so more frequent assessments are required.

    It can also be an advantage to the building’s owner to have a more recent assessment.  This is particularly true where energy efficiency improvements have been carried out that are not reflected in the current certificate.  Where buildings are tenanted, it can also make life easier for a landlord if assessments are renewed at strategic points within the tenancy cycle.

    Exemptions

    England
    Scotland
    Wales
    Northern Ireland
    England

    Currently, exemptions are in place for dwellings in England that are:

    • temporary buildings that will be used for less than 2 years
    • stand-alone buildings with total useful floor space of less than 50m²
    • some buildings that are due to be demolished where the planning process for this has already been completed
    • properties being let that are holiday accommodation and rented out for less than 4 months a year
    • properties being let (not sold) under a licence to occupy instead of a tenancy
    • some Listed Buildings in specific circumstances – you should get advice from your local authority conservation officer if the work would alter the building’s character.  More information is available here.
    • residential buildings intended to be used less than 4 months a year

    Scotland

    Exemptions are currently in place for dwellings in Scotland that are:

    • temporary buildings with a planned time of use of two years or less.

    Wales

    Currently, exemptions are in place for dwellings in Wales that are:

    • temporary buildings that will be used for less than 2 years
    • stand-alone buildings with total useful floor space of less than 50m²
    • some buildings that are due to be demolished where the planning process for this has already been completed
    • properties being let that are holiday accommodation and rented out for less than 4 months a year
    • properties being let (not sold) under a licence to occupy instead of a tenancy
    • some Listed Buildings in specific circumstances – you should get advice from your local authority conservation officer if the work would alter the building’s character.  More information is available here.
    • residential buildings intended to be used less than 4 months a year

    Northern Ireland

    Exemptions are currently in place for dwellings in Northern Ireland that are:

    • temporary buildings with a planned time of use of two years or less